Rings of Culture

Objective: The participants will be able to develop an understanding around the rings of culture (this activity should be done after the What is Culture activity).

Rings of Culture

Objective: The participants will be able to develop an understanding around the rings of culture (this activity should be done after the What is Culture activity).

Activity:

Review with participants the definition of culture. Think back to the iceberg of culture. On the top are surface things we can easily see. Below the surface are more complex ideas, beliefs and values that are shaped by our various rings of culture. Watch the Video Iceberg of Culture.  

When thinking about the various rings of culture we have, there are seven in particular that are going to be addressed: age, gender, orientation, religious, nationality, socioeconomic or class and ethnic culture. 

Next, use the Rings of Culture google slides to introduce the different rings. Use the literacy strategy of Jump in Reading as you move through the slides. On each slide, have one participant jump in and read the slide.

Have participants form groups of four. Hand out post-it-notes with a variety of the below the surface elements listed. Have them discuss which ring that cultural element could be coming from.

For example, the concept of fairness could be age culture, As a person goes through the various stages of development, the idea of what fairness means changes as that person matures. It can also come from the religious culture. If a person's religion determines the standard of fair, that idea will influence a person's idea of fairness.  

The heart of this activity is having the discussion about how each of those cultural elements is coming from one or more rings of culture. Determining which ring, is not as important as recognizing that they all come from our various rings of culture. The conversation at tables should lead participants to recognize this idea, naturally, after they spend some time looking at these various elements. They might start to ask, ”What is the right answer?” If they do, share with them that the work is in the thought process, and there isn't a right or wrong answer. 

Around the room have the various rings of cultures listed on chart paper. Then, ask the participants to place their post-it-notes onto the agreed upon ring of culture poster.

Wrap it up with a Whip Around having one person from each group share about one element and where they placed it.