Managing My Feelings

  • 3

  • 4

  • 5

Objective: The students will be able to express various feelings and share ways to change or manage different emotions.

Managing My Feelings

  • 3

  • 4

  • 5

Objective: The students will be able to express various feelings and share ways to change or manage different emotions.

Activity:

SEL Competency: Self Management

CSC Unit Goal: Students will be able to apply strategies of self management, through deep self reflection of their own cultural identities and behaviors, by using strategies of stress management, self regulation, self motivation, goal setting, and organizational skills through a cultural responsive lens to be able to juxtapose between different life situations and to begin to overcome and combat discrimation and inequalities.

Section: Managing Emotions

 

Teacher Background:

Please read the following article: “How Racism Affects Minorities Students in Public Schools” by Nadra Kareem Nittle. After reading the article, think about ways that your students react to systemic or situational events that may seem unfair to them based on their cultural background. How does a student from a traditionally marginalized background deal with an “unfair” situation and how are they supported in their right to object?

Activity #1:

What are emotions? Ask students to use Turn and Talk protocol to share their answer to that question, with a partner. Have a few students share their answers. Next, have a variety of emojis on chart paper. You can use “EMOJI EMOTIONS IMAGES” (attached document) for this activity. See if your students can identify those emotions.

Use Carousel Brainstorm protocol around emotions. Take various emojis and place them on different pieces of chart paper. On one part of the paper, ask students what makes them feel this emotion. On the other part, ask them to share how their body feels when they are feeling that emotion (anger - when someone takes my stuff, my cheeks get hot, my voice gets loud, and I feel like I am going to explode).

After they have written on all the papers, have them synthesize the information, on the last paper, for everyone in the class. As they synthesize, make sure you explain to the students that emotions are felt and expressed differently in different cultures. Have them think about the differences in the way emotions can be felt and expressed. Have them think about the similarities and differences in how emotions are expressed in their families. 

Use Roll ‘Em protocol to share out. Don’t forget to use the protocol, Show Some Love, for those who share!

 

Activity #2:

How do we manage our emotions? The first step is to name the emotions so we know what it is we are feeling. What name do you give the emotion you are feeling?

Show one of the “EMOJI EMOTIONS IMAGES” (attached document) and ask the students to think about what name to give that emotion. Use Raise a Hand protocol to have students share out.

Next, we have to express that emotion by saying what it is and why we are feeling that way: "I am angry because __________. I am sad because __________. I am excited because ___________."

Show the same emoji again and have students use Turn and Talk protocol to express that emotion to each other.

Once you name them and express them, you can decide what you want to do with them. Do you need to calm down and breathe to let go of that emotion, look for a solution, or ask for help to deal with that emotion?

Show the same emoji to the students again. Have them use the protocol, Think, Pair, Share, to tell each other what they would do with that emotion. Then, use Pick a Stick protocol to have students share out. If needed, use “SPEAKING FRAMES SHEET” (attached document) to help students put it all together.

If you are angry because a friend took your favorite crayon, what could you do? (Name the emotion, express the emotion, and then decide what you need.) For example, "I am feeling angry, John. I am angry because you took my favorite crayon. Can you please give it back to me?"

 

Teacher Background:

Please read the following article: “How Racism Affects Minorities Students in Public Schools” by Nadra Kareem Nittle. After reading the article, think about ways that your students react to systemic or situational events that may seem unfair to them based on their cultural background. How does a student from a traditionally marginalized background deal with an “unfair” situation and how are they supported in their right to object?

Teacher Prep:

On the board, write the following questions for students to refer to during the Round-Robin Brainstorming Activity: Why was the school/classroom unfair? How did you react to the unfair rule? Did the reaction make the situation worse? Could you have reacted differently? What would make the rule more fair? How can you advocate for making the rule more equitable and who do you need to reach out to, to support you in this process?

Activity #3:

Using Moment of Silence protocol, have the students think about a time they thought or were faced with an unfair (inequitable) school, classroom rule, or policy. Have them think about what happened and if the issue was resolved or how they wish it was resolved. 

After about two minutes, have students gather into groups of four to implement Round-Robin Brainstorming protocol activity. The recorder will write down, on a piece of paper, ideas of the steps they could use to address and possibly change the “unfair” inequitable school/classroom rule.

Have students think about the questions on the board to come up with steps on how to make the rule “fair” (equitable). After the students have finished brainstorming, the teacher will gather ideas and write them on chart paper, using the Stand and Deliver protocol.

 

Common Core Standards:

  • 3.SL.1 ( Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. )

  • 3.SL.1.a ( Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. )

  • 3.SL.1.b ( Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). )

  • 3.SL.1.d ( Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. )

  • 4.SL.1 ( Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. )

  • 4.SL.1.a ( Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. )

  • 4.SL.1.b ( Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. )

  • 4.SL.1.d ( Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. )

  • 5.SL.1 ( Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. )

  • 5.SL.1.a ( Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. )

  • 5.SL.1.b ( Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. )

  • 5.SL.1.d ( Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions. )