Prejudice

  • 6

  • 7

  • 8

Objective: To explore the concept of prejudice and to consider the unfairness of judging people on the basis of characteristics over which they have no control.

Prejudice

  • 6

  • 7

  • 8

Objective: To explore the concept of prejudice and to consider the unfairness of judging people on the basis of characteristics over which they have no control.

Activity:

Activity #1:

Have students turn and talk about what they think the word prejudice means.

Use Raise a  Hand protocol to have partners share out. 

Share this definition with the class:

Prejudice: a preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual experience.

Use one of the example of prejudice from our history, and an example from the present.

Ask students to Think, Pair, Share what they think the preconceived opinions might have played a part in that event occuring.  

Put the rest of the examples of prejudice onto chart paper and hang up around the room.

Divide students up into groups of four. Have them use the protocol Carousel Brainstorm for students to write down possible preconceived opinions that might have played a role in the example of prejudice that is on their sheet.

Each group should  be prepared to share out with the class their thoughts. 

Use Rock, Paper, Scissors protocol for groups to choose who will share out for their group.

Examples of prejudice:

*Until the early years of the twentieth century, women were not allowed to vote.

*In Afghanistan, when the Taliban were in charge, women could not be educated and had to cover their faces when outside their homes.

*Women have not been allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia, and they are required to walk behind the man who is with them.

*In the United States, black people could not sit in the front of buses or use the same water fountains as white people until the 1950s and 1960s.

*Private clubs are often exclusive. For example, some don’t allow members who are black or Jewish, or women.

*Some people will not buy a Japanese car because of the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

*After 9/11, anyone who looked Middle Eastern was looked at suspiciously and was often the victim of prejudice.

*Some landlords will not rent to a gay couple.

*After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Japanese Americans, who lived in the US, were rounded up and put into internment camps.

*Hallmark, the card company, has swapped the word ‘gay’ for ‘fun’ in the song ‘Deck the Halls.’

*In the past, some companies only hired females to be secretaries.

*Some people assume that all tall people or all blacks are good at basketball.

*Apartheid in South Africa was racial segregation where non-whites could not vote and had to live in separate communities. 

*In a divorce, women are usually given custody of the children.

*Bullying can be caused by a prejudice against people who are different.

*Some people assume someone is gay because of the way they act.

*The hobby retailer Hobby Lobby has been known to not sell Jewish menorahs.

*Some parents will not approve their offspring marrying anyone of a different religion.

*Some corporations hire women but do not promote any of them to supervisory positions.

*It is sometimes assumed that someone who is physically disabled is also mentally disabled.

Activity #2:

Review the definition of the word prejudice.

As a class use the protocol Ball Toss to have a discussion about when they have seen prejudice happen.

Record the examples on the board. Share out what the reason could be why that prejudice exists.

Activity #3:

Divide students into small groups and instruct them to develop short skits that illustrate the difference between prejudice and a legitimate reason for not wanting to associate with someone.

Provide an opportunity for each group to present its skit to the whole group and follow each presentation with a brief discussion.


    
    
 

Common Core Standards:

  • 6.SL.1 ( Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. )

  • 6.SL.1.b ( Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. )

  • 6.SL.1.c ( Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. )

  • 6.SL.1.d ( Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. )

  • 7.SL.1 ( Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. )

  • 7.SL.1.c ( Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed. )

  • 7.SL.1.d ( Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views. )

  • 8.SL.1 ( Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. )

  • 8.SL.1.b ( Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. )

  • 8.SL.1.c ( Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas. )

  • 8.SL.1.d ( Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views in light of the evidence presented. )